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Which Scope Mounts Do I Need?

Nowadays, several firearm enthusiasts have started using scopes and other types of optical sighting accessories on their weapons, including rifles, shotguns, and handguns as well. 

These accessories allow them to see clearly in low-light settings and also make it easier for them to scout their target from a larger distance. By reviewing the different types of rifle scope mounts and checking out their specifications, you will be able to better decide which one will provide you with a better field of view. 

In this article, we will discuss how to choose the right scope mounts for your guns.

Types of Scope Mounts

Most people get excited while buying their first scope mount, and they don’t pay too much attention to what they are buying. Even if you are paying someone to install the scope for you, make sure that they match the mount to the scope before you pay them. Here are some common types of scope mounts that you should know about. 

Picatinny Mounts

The Picatinny mount is one of the most popular scope mounts out there, and it is preferred due to its standardized sizing and universal fit. Therefore, several manufacturers also create accessories that perfectly fit it. The Picatinny mount provides you with ease of installation, thanks to the multiple slots that allow you to adjust it just the way you want. Moreover, the extended length of this mount helps you achieve the best configuration for your scope. Plus, you can also combine them with 20 MOA bases to get better elevation adjustment. 

Weaver Mounts

Weaver mounts are slightly different from Picatinny mounts. If you are looking to buy them for your gun, make sure that the ring size matches the tube width of the scope. This way, the rings will sit perfectly around the tube, and you can secure the rail to the base. They are best used with Weaver bases since Picatinny accessories, and other brands don’t fit properly on the Weaver bases. Weaver mounts come in one and two-piece rails. However, their slot widths aren’t standardized on all Weaver rails.

Dovetail Mounts

Dovetail mounts go hand-in-hand with dovetail rings, and they are also known as tip-off rings since they can be ‘tipped off’ the rail when you loosen the screws. Similar to Weaver mounts, the ring size of these mounts should be according to the scope’s tube size, while the ring base should also be equal to the rail size.

Single-Piece Mounts

Single-piece mounts are another common type of mount that can be used with different brands of rails and scopes. Also called one-piece mounts, these mounts are easier to install and adjust since they are durable, robust, and easy to mount. Thanks to its one-piece design, you don’t have to worry about aligning the scope and rings because it takes care of everything for you. The mount also comes with the base that attaches to the rifle with the locks and rings to secure it in place. It is perfect for rifles with high recoil. You might need to reconsider putting them on bolt action rifles.

Two-Piece Mounts

Two-piece mounts involve the assembly of two different rings directly to a two-piece rail. These ones are perfect for bolt action rifles, as it allows you to freely work the chamber and bolt. Plus, it is also perfect for people with large fingers or glove-clad hands. Although they are comparatively lighter in weight, you need to properly align the rings to prevent any performance and focusing issues.

Integral Mounts

These mounts are always specific to the manufacturer of the rifle scope since the manufacturer designs the rifle scope and mount as one piece, which can be attached directly to the gun. This makes it much easier for you to attach them to a rifle, and it eliminates the need to work with different rings and components. Some integral mounts are quite similar to one-piece mounts that come with rings and a base that can be attached only to the receiver.

Offset Mounts

Offset mounts, or cantilever mounts, are also one-piece mounts, but they have a slightly different and ‘offset’ design. Mostly designed for AR-style platforms, they come with rings and a base that you can easily attach to a Picatinny rail. The rings on these mounts are further along the mounting length, which gives you sufficient space between the scope’s eyepiece and your brow, and also helps you achieve a full field of view.

20 MOA Base Mounts

20 MOA Base Mounts are popularly used with Picatinny accessories, thus providing extra elevation adjustment for long-range shooting. They are different from other bases, which are level with the rifle’s bore. These mounts also come with a canted base, which allows you to point the scope slightly downwards, which also enhances the elevation adjustment.

Conclusion

The mounting system of your scope is as important as the scope itself, and there are many different options to choose from. This concludes our guide on which scope mounts you need. 

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